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Economic Botany

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 80–109 | Cite as

Traditional and modern plant use among the Alyawara of central Australia

  • James F. O’Connell
  • Peter K. Latz
  • Peggy Barnett
Article

Abstract

This is a descriptive summary of information on traditional and modern uses of native plants by Alyawara-speaking Australian Aborigines. It includes data on 157 species, 92 of which are used for food, 28 for medicines and narcotics, and 10 in the manufacture of tools, weapons and other gear. Descriptions of food plants cover form and distribution, collecting and processing techniques, caloric yields, and dietary importance. The paper concludes with some comments on traditional plant cultivation practices.

Keywords

Bark Eucalyptus Economic Botany Ipomoea Western Desert 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. O’Connell
    • 1
  • Peter K. Latz
    • 2
  • Peggy Barnett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake City
  2. 2.Conservation Commission of the Northern TerritoryAlice SpringsAustralia

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