Advertisement

Journal of Forestry Research

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 119–122 | Cite as

Turbulence regime near the forest floor of a mixed broad leaved/Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountains

  • Zhang Jun-hui
  • Ding Zhi-Hui
  • Han Shi-jie
  • Zou Chun-jing
  • Zhou Yu-mei
Article

Abstract

The measurement and observation for this study were carried out by using a three-dimensional (u, v, w) Sonic anemometer (IAP-SA 485), at Forest Ecosystem Opened Research Station of Changbai Mountains (128°28’E and 42°24’N, Jilin Province, P.R. China) in August 2001. The basic characteristics of turbulence, such as turbulence intensity, atmospheric stability, time scales, and convection state, near the forest floor were analyzed. It is concluded that the airflow near forest floor is characterized by high intermittence and asymmetry, and the active and upward movement takes the leading position. Near forest floor, the vertical turbulence is retained and its time scale and length scale are much less than that ofu, v components. The eddy near forest floor shows a flat structure and look like a ‘Disk’. Buoyancy plays a leading role in the generation and maintenance of local turbulence.

Keywords

Forest floor Velocity statistics Atmospheric stability Convection states 

CLC number

S718.51 

Document code

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, L.J. 1968. Turbulence and wind speed spectra within a Japanese Larch plantation [J]. J. Appl. Meteorol,7: 73–78CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amiro, B.D. and Davis, P.A., 1988. Statistics of atmospheric turbulence within a natural black spruce forest canopy [J]. Boundary-Layer Meteorology44: 267–283CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Amiro, B.D. 1990. Comparison of turbulence statistics within three boreal forest canopies [J]. Boundary-Layer Meteorology,51: 99–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Aylor, B.D. 1991. Aerobiology and atmospheric turbulence—examining the interface[C]. 10th Conf. on Biometeorol. and Aerobiol. Am. Meteorol. Soc., Salt Lake City, UT.Google Scholar
  5. Baldocchi, D.D. and Meyers, T.P. 1988. Turbulence structure in a deciduous forest [J]. Boundary-Layer Meteorology,43: 345–364CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Ivan, A.J.et al. 2000. Assessing forest soil CO2 efflux: an in situ comparison of four techniques [J]. Tree Physiology, 20: 23–32.Google Scholar
  7. Jacoba, A.F.G.et al. 1994. Nighttime free convection characteristics within a plant canopy. Boundary-Layer Meteorology [J],71: 375–391CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Law, B.E.et al. 1999. Below-canopy and soil co2 flux in a ponderosa pine forest. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology [J].94: 171–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Lee, X.h. and Black, T.A. 1993. Turbulence near the forest floor of an old-growth Douglas fir stand on a south-facing slope [J]. Forest Science,39(2): 211–230.Google Scholar
  10. Moritz, E. 1989. Heat and momentum transport in an oak forest canopy [J]. Boundary-Layer Meteorology,49, 317–329CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Raich, J.W. and Schlesinger, W.H. 1992. The global carbon dioxide flux in soil respiration and its relationship to vegetation and climate [J]. Tellus,44: 81–99Google Scholar
  12. Shaw, R.H. 1985. On diffusive and dispersive fluxes in forest canopies. In: B.A. Hutchison and B.B. Hicks (eds.), the Forest-Atmospheric Interaction [C]. D. Reidel. Co., Dordrecht., p407–419Google Scholar
  13. Shaw, R.H. and Seginer, I. 1987. Calculation of velocity skewness in real and artificial plant canopies [J]. Boundary-Layer Meteorology,39: 315–332CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Zelger, M.et al. 1997. Turbulent transport characteristic, length and time scales above and within the bema forest site at Castel porziano [J]. Atmospheric Environment,31: 217–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Zhang Junhuiet al. 2002., Dominant Time scale Characteristics of the turbulence across Canopy—Atmosphere Interface of Mixed board leaved-Korean pine Forest in Changbai Moutain [J] Journal of Forestry Research, (Submitted)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhang Jun-hui
    • 1
  • Ding Zhi-Hui
    • 2
  • Han Shi-jie
    • 1
  • Zou Chun-jing
    • 1
  • Zhou Yu-mei
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Applied EcologyChinese Academy of SciencesShenyangP.R. China
  2. 2.Administration of Changbai Mountain Natural ReserveAntu, Jilin ProvinceP.R. China

Personalised recommendations