Neurochemical Pathology

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 169–180 | Cite as

Agonal status affects the metabolic activity of nerve endings isolated from postmortem human brain

  • P. Wester
  • D. E. Bateman
  • P. R. Dodd
  • J. A. Edwardson
  • J. A. Hardy
  • A. M. Kidd
  • R. H. Perry
  • G. B. Singh
Original Articles

Abstract

Isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) that show high rates of metabolic activity have been prepared up to 24 h postmortem from the brains of patients who have died suddenly. In contrast, similar preparations from brains of patients dying after a prolonged terminal illness showed little or no respiration. These data suggest that the agonal state of the patient is of major importance when investigating specific defects in neurotransmitter function in cerebral disorders and effects of neuroactive drugs on human tissue.

Index Entries

Synaptosomes postmortem human brain, agonal status and metabolic activity in human brain, agonal status and metabolic activity in postmortem agonal state, and metabolic activity in postmortem human brain brain, agonal status and metabolic activity in postmortem human metabolic activity, and agonal status in postmortem human brain nerve endings, activity in postmortem human brain 

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Wester
    • 1
  • D. E. Bateman
    • 2
  • P. R. Dodd
    • 3
    • 4
  • J. A. Edwardson
    • 2
  • J. A. Hardy
    • 4
  • A. M. Kidd
    • 2
  • R. H. Perry
    • 2
  • G. B. Singh
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of UmeåUmeåSweden
  2. 2.MRC Neuroendocrinology UnitNewcastle General HospitalNewcastle upon TyneEngland
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  4. 4.Department of BiochemistrySt. Marys Hospital Medical SchoolLondonEngland
  5. 5.Department of PathologyHexham General HospitalHexhamEngland

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