Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with calcium oxalate calculus disease

  • Wang Shaogang
  • Liu Jihong
  • Hu Shaoqun
  • Ye Zhangqun
Article

Summary

To study the relationship between polymorphism of vitamin D receptor (VDR) allele with formation of calcium oxalate calculus and find the predisposing genes of calcium oxalate calculus, we screened out 150 patients who suffered from calcium oxalate calculus. 36 of them had idiopathic hypercalciuria according to analysis of calculus component and assay of urine calcium. The polymorphisms of VDR gene Taq1, Apa1 and Fok1 were detected using PCR-RFLP technique and the correlation were analyzed between the polymorphism and urinary calculus or between the polymorphism and hypercalciuria. The difference in each genotypic frequency of the allele of promoter Fok1 between calculus group and healthy group or between idiopathic hypercalciuria calculus group and health group was significant. The content of 24-h urine calcium of those who had genotype ff was obviously higher than that of those who have other genotypes in the same group. There was no significant difference in the polymorphism of gene Apa1 and Taq1 between each two groups. It is concluded that hypercalciuria and calcium oxalate calculus were related to the polymorphism of VDR gene’s promoter Fok1 allele, but it had nothing to do with the polymorphism of gene Apa1 and Taq1. The genotype ff was a candidate heredity marker of calcium calculus disease.

Key words

gene polymorphism vitamin D receptor calcium oxalate calculus hypercalciuria 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wang Shaogang
    • 1
  • Liu Jihong
    • 1
  • Hu Shaoqun
    • 1
  • Ye Zhangqun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhan

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