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Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 73–75 | Cite as

Enrichment of bifidobacteria in the hen caeca by dietary inulin

  • V. Rada
  • D. Dušková
  • M. Marounek
  • J. Petr
2nd ISAM (International Symposium on Anaerobic Microbiology) Anaerobic Microbiology: Centeral European Perspective held in Prague (Czechia) November 10–11, 2000

Abstract

Caecal bifidobacterial concentration was increased more than 3-fold in inulin-treated laying hens. The counts of bifidobacteria in birds fed as the control were 9.64, in inulin-diet fed ones 10.17 log CFU/g of caecal content, respectively. Dietary inulin had no effect on caecal microbial metabolite concentration. The proportion of inulin-fermenting bifidobacteria in the total bifidobacteria increased 2-fold in inulin-treated birds.

Keywords

Inulin Mupirocin Total Viable Count Microbial Metabolite Burdock Root 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Folia Microbiologia 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Rada
    • 1
  • D. Dušková
    • 2
  • M. Marounek
    • 2
  • J. Petr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and BiotechnologyCzech University of AgriculturePrague 6Czechia
  2. 2.Institute of Animal Physiology and GeneticsAcademy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicPrague 10Czechia

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