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Development of a nontoxic acoustic window nutrient-mist bioreactor and relevant growth data

  • C. S. Buer
  • M. J. Correll
  • T. C. Smith
  • M. J. Towler
  • P. J. Weathers
  • M. Nadler
  • J. Seaman
  • D. Walcerz
Secondary Metabolism

Summary

A nutrient-mist bioreactor was designed that separates the nutrient medium from the electronic components via an acoustic window. This eliminates compromising culture sterility when repairing mechanical failures common with commercially available mist reactors. The experimental mist bioreactor is low cost and can be assembled in any laboratory. Toxicity tests of several potential acoustically transparent materials are included. Details of the construction procedures include methods for casting the window. Growth data using the newly designed nutrient mist bioreactor are compared to data from a commercial mist reactor, shake flasks, and Gelrite cultures.Artemisia annua hairy roots andNephrolepis exaltata shoot cultures showed growth comparable to the conventional tissue culture methods.

Key words

aeroponics Artemisia annua Nephrolepis exaltata ultrasonic transducer acoustically transparent materials hairy roots 

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Copyright information

© Society for In Vitro Biology 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Buer
    • 1
  • M. J. Correll
    • 1
  • T. C. Smith
    • 1
  • M. J. Towler
    • 1
  • P. J. Weathers
    • 1
  • M. Nadler
    • 2
  • J. Seaman
    • 2
  • D. Walcerz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biology/BiotechnologyWorcester Polytechnic InstituteWorcester
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringWorcester Polytechnic InstituteWorcester

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