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The American Journal of Psychoanalysis

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 109–125 | Cite as

The engendering of female subjectivity

  • Jane Van Buren
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Copyright information

© Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Van Buren
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Training and Supervising Analyst, The Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, Training and Supervising Analyst and Assistant DeanThe Psychoanalytic Center of CaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.The Wright InstituteLos Angeles

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