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Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

, Volume 3, Issue 6, pp 763–774 | Cite as

Tensile properties of haynes alloy 230 and inconel 617 after long exposures to LiF-22CaF2 and vacuum at 1093 K

  • J. D. Whittenberger
Testing and Evaluation

Abstract

As a part of a study of a space-based thermal energy storage system utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the eutectic salt LiF-20CaF2 (mole%), the two wrought Ni-base superalloys Haynes alloy 230 and Inconel 617 were subjected to molten salt, its vapor, and vacuum for periods as long as 10,000 h at 1093 K. Following exposure, the microstructures were characterized, and samples from each superalloy were tensile tested between 77 and 1200 K. Neither the structure nor mechanical properties revealed evidence for additional degradation due to exposures to the salt. Although some loss in tensile properties was noted, particularly at 77 K, this reduction could be ascribed to the influence of simple aging at 1093 K.

Keywords

Inconel 617 Haynes alloy 230 heat treatment long term exposure superalloy tensile properties thermal energy storage 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Whittenberger
    • 1
  1. 1.NASALewis Research CenterClevelandUSA

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