The personality assessment inventory as a selection device for law enforcement personnel

  • William U. Weiss
  • Cary Rostow
  • Robert Davis
  • Emily DeCoster-Martin
Article

Abstract

The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is a recent development in psychological assessment which has attracted attention because of the breadth of its coverage and the fact that it includes a four-point scale of item agreement. Matrix, Incorporated, is a psychological assessment center that specializes in the assessment of law enforcement personnel. Matrix has collected performance variables on 800 police officers who had taken the PAI prior to being hired. Correlational analysis was performed and there was a significant effect in the data. Discussion focuses upon the criteria in relation to the PAI variables, particularly with regard to aggression, antisocial characteristics and the validity scales. The data clearly demonstrate that the PAI has good potential for the selection of law enforcement officers.

Keywords

Police Officer Validity Scale Criminal Psychology Police Selection Psychological Assessment Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society for Police and Criminal Psychology 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • William U. Weiss
    • 1
  • Cary Rostow
    • 2
  • Robert Davis
    • 2
  • Emily DeCoster-Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of EvansvilleEvansville
  2. 2.Matrix, Inc.Baton Rouge

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