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Audiovisual communication review

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 104–117 | Cite as

Problems involving a number of factors

Scientific Principles for Maximum Learning from Motion Pictures
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Keywords

Motion Picture Special Device Instructional Film Educational Film Audience Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1957

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