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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 47, Issue 1–3, pp 349–353 | Cite as

Effects of selenium supplementation on thyroid hormone metabolism in phenylketonuria subjects on a phenylalanine restricted diet

  • Mario Calomme
  • Jean Vanderpas
  • Baudouin François
  • Micheline Van Caillie-Bertrand
  • Nicole Vanovervelt
  • Christian Van Hoorebeke
  • Dirk Vanden Berghe
Part XI Nutrition

Abstract

Type I 5′-deiodinase was recently characterized as a selenocysteine-containing enzyme in humans and other mammals. Up to now, the effect of selenium (Se) supplementation on thyroid hormone metabolism in humans has only been reported in the very peculiar nutritional environment of Central Africa, where combined severe iodine and Se deficiency occurs. In this study, a group of phenylketonuria subjects with a low selenium status, but a normal iodine intake were supplemented with selenium to investigate changes in their thyroid hormone metabolism. After 3 wk of selenium supplementation (1 μg/kg/d), both the concentrations of the prohormone thyroxine (T4) and the metabolic inactive reverse triiodothyronine (rT3) decreased significantly. Clinically, the phenylketonuria subjects remained euthyroid before and after selenium supplementation. The individual changes of plasma Se and glutathione peroxidase activity were closely associated with individual changes of plasma T4 and rT3.

Index Entries

Phenylketonuria selenium glutathione peroxidase thyroid hormones type I iodothyronine deiodinase supplementation 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario Calomme
    • 1
  • Jean Vanderpas
    • 2
  • Baudouin François
    • 3
  • Micheline Van Caillie-Bertrand
    • 1
  • Nicole Vanovervelt
    • 2
  • Christian Van Hoorebeke
    • 1
  • Dirk Vanden Berghe
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  2. 2.Inter University Center Hôpital Ambroise ParéMonsBelgium
  3. 3.Dr. Willems InstituteDiepenbeekBelgium

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