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Iodine deficiency, other trace elements, and goitrogenic factors in the etiopathogeny of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD)

  • C. H. Thilly
  • J. B. Vanderpas
  • N. Bebe
  • K. Ntambue
  • B. Contempre
  • B. Swennen
  • R. Moreno-Reyes
  • P. Bourdoux
  • F. Delange
Part 2: Trace elements in endocrinology Section 2: Thyroid

Abstract

Severe goiter, cretinism, and the other iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) have their main cause in the lack of availability of iodine from the soil linked to a severe limitation of food exchanges. Apart from the degrees of severity of the iodine deficiency, the frequencies and symptomatologies of cretinism and the other IDD are influenced by other goitrogenic factors and trace elements. Thiocyanate overload originating from consumption of poorly detoxified cassava is such deficiency. Very recently, a severe selenium deficiency has also been associated with IDD in the human population, whereas in animals, it has been proven to play a role in thyroid function either through a thyroidal or extrathyroidal mechanism. The former involves oxidative damages mediated by free radicals, whereas the latter implies an inhibition of the deiodinase responsible for the utilization of T4 into T3. One concludes that:
  1. 1.

    Goiter has a multifactorial origin

     
  2. 2.

    IDD are an important public health problem; and

     
  3. 3.

    IDD are a good model to study the effects of other trace elements whose actions in many human metabolisms have been somewhat underestimated.

     

Index Entries

Iodine deficiency disorders goitrogenic factor trace elements selenium deficiency thiocyanate overload free radical deiodinase hypothyroidism 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Thilly
    • 1
  • J. B. Vanderpas
    • 1
  • N. Bebe
    • 2
  • K. Ntambue
    • 3
  • B. Contempre
    • 1
  • B. Swennen
    • 1
  • R. Moreno-Reyes
    • 1
  • P. Bourdoux
    • 1
  • F. Delange
    • 1
  1. 1.Cemubac University of BrusselsBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.School of Public Health of KinshasaZaire
  3. 3.Bureau National TDCI Kinshasa/GombeZaire

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