Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 65, Issue 2, pp 117–131

Effects of dietary supplementation with aluminum and citrate on iron metabolism in the rat

  • Evan H. Morgan
  • Trevor G. Redgrave
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF02784264

Cite this article as:
Morgan, E.H. & Redgrave, T.G. Biol Trace Elem Res (1998) 65: 117. doi:10.1007/BF02784264

Abstract

The metabolism of iron (Fe) has been shown to interact with that of aluminum (Al) in relation to intestinal absorption, transport in the blood plasma, and the induction of lipid peroxidation and cellular damage. Also, dietary supplementation with citrate has been shown to increase the absorption of both metals and, in the presence of high intakes of Fe and Al, leads to excessive accumulation of both metals in the body. In this study, the likely interaction between Al and internal Fe metabolism was investigated using rats fed diets that were either deficient, sufficient, or loaded with Fe, with or without the addition of Al and sodium citrate. These diets commenced when the rats were 4 wk old and were continued for 9–11 wk. At that time, Fe metabolism as assessed by measurement of organ uptake of59Fe and125I-transferrin, after iv injection of transferrin labeled with both isotopes, plus measurement of tissue concentrations of nonheme Fe and Al. The Fedeficient diet and Fe-loaded diet led to states of Fe deficiency and Fe overload in the rats, and supplementation of the diet with Al increased Al levels in the kidneys, liver, and femurs, but, generally, only when the diet also contained citrate. Neither Al nor citrate supplementation of the diet had any effect on nonheme Fe concentrations in the liver, kidney, or brain, or on the uptake of59Fe or125I-transferrin by liver, kidney, brain, or spleen. Only with the femurs was a significant effect observed: increased59Fe uptake in association with increased Al intake. Therefore, using this animal model, there was little evidence for interaction between Fe and Al metabolism, and no support was obtained for the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with Fe and citrate can lead to excessive Fe absorption and deposition in the tissues.

Index entries

Iron metabolism iron deficiency iron overload dietary aluminum dietary citrate 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evan H. Morgan
    • 1
  • Trevor G. Redgrave
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyThe University of Western Australia NedlandsWestern AustraliaAustralia

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