TechTrends

, Volume 47, Issue 6, pp 62–66 | Cite as

Ethics: A discourse of power

  • Robert Muffoletto
Article

Conclusion

In conclusion, moral and ethical criteria generated by normalized reality, steers and directs what we who practice in the field of educational technology do. The challenge for us is to see and to understand our field as a construct within a particular tradition at a particular point in time. As national boundaries dissolve, time is reformatted, and distance (space) becomes almost non-existent, the challenge is to understand and honor different ethical perspectives, while at the same time search for a truth which values and transcends the individual and the community, to reach a common good.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2003

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  • Robert Muffoletto

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