The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 345–351 | Cite as

Enteric viral infections in pre-school children in Karachi, Pakistan

  • Mubina Agboatwalla
  • Shin Isomura
  • Dure-Samin Akram
  • Yuichi Isihara
  • Kenji Sakae
  • Teruo Yamashita
  • Osamu Nishuo
Original Article

Abstract

A prospective study was conducted in Karachi, Pakistan on the virology of enteropathogens excreted by children with acute gastroenteritis and the results were compared with a control group of healthy children. Rotavirus and Adenovirus detection was done using ELISA techniques, while enterovirus isolation was done by virus culture. In 1990, 12.3% children with acute watery diarrhoea excreted rotavirus, as compared to 24.4% children in 1991. None of the healthy children excreted adenovirus 40 and 41. Preliminary results of 1992 revealed that rotavirus was seen in 13% of children with acute watery diarrhoea and adenovirus in 10% of children. Enteroviruses were isolated in the same frequency in all three groups i.e. children with acute watery diarrhoea, children with poliomyelitis and healthy children. Non-polio enteroviruses were excreted in 50–52% in all the 3 groups. The rate of enterovirus excretion is much higher than seen in other developed countries and is the same in children with diarrhoea and healthy children.

Key words

Adenovirus Rotavirus Acute gastroenteritis Acute poliomyelitis 

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mubina Agboatwalla
    • 1
  • Shin Isomura
    • 2
  • Dure-Samin Akram
    • 1
  • Yuichi Isihara
    • 3
  • Kenji Sakae
    • 3
  • Teruo Yamashita
    • 3
  • Osamu Nishuo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Unit-IICivil HospitalKarachi
  2. 2.Department of Medical Zoology, School of MedicineNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of VirologyAichi Prefectural Institute of Public HealthNagoyaJapan

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