Advertisement

Bulletin of Materials Science

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 481–493 | Cite as

Evaluation of the reactivity of titanium with mould materials during casting

  • R L Saha
  • T K Nandy
  • R D K Misra
  • K T Jacob
Article

Abstract

A methodology for evaluating the reactivity of titanium with mould materials during casting has been developed. Microhardness profiles and analysis of oxygen contamination have provided an index for evaluation of the reactivity of titanium. Microhardness profile delineates two distinct regions, one of which is characterised by a low value of hardness which is invariant with distance. The reaction products are uniformly distributed in the metal in this region. The second is characterised by a sharp decrease in microhardness with distance from the metal-mould interface. It represents a diffusion zone for solutes that dissolve into titanium from the mould. The qualitative profiles for contaminants determined by scanning electron probe microanalyser and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in the as-cast titanium were found to be similar to that of microhardness, implying that microhardness can be considered as an index of the contamination resulting from metal-mould reaction.

Keywords

Titanium reactivity casting oxygen microhardness secondary electron probe microanalysis secondary ion mass spectrometry 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. David D, Gracia E A and Beranger G 1980Proceedings of Titanium 1980 (eds) H Kimura and O Ozumi (Warrendale: The Met. Soc. AIME) p. 537Google Scholar
  2. Fores F H 1987J. Met. 39 3Google Scholar
  3. Ignatov D V, Sokyniansky L F and Shinyaev A Ya 1973Titanium science and technology (eds) R I Jaffee and H M Burte (New York: Plenum) p. 2535Google Scholar
  4. Mahoney M V and Paton N E 1977 The effect of minor alloying elements on mechanical properties of titanium alloys, AFML Report-TR-75-56, AFML OhioGoogle Scholar
  5. Mukherjee D, Saha R L and Chakravorty C R 1985Trans. Indian Inst. Met. 38 465Google Scholar
  6. Murray J L and Wriedt R A 1986Binary alloy phase diagrams (ed.) T B Massalski (Ohio: American Society for Metals) p. 1789Google Scholar
  7. Newman J R 1980Metals handbook (Ohio: American Society for Metals) vol. 3, p. 407Google Scholar
  8. Pavlinov L V 1967Fiz. Metal. Z. Metalloved. 24 272Google Scholar
  9. Raghavan V 1985Materials science and engineering (New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India) p. 172Google Scholar
  10. Saha R L, Nandy T K, Misra R D K and Jacob K T 1989Int. Cast. Metals J. (submitted).Google Scholar
  11. Tylecote R F 1979A history of metallurgy (London: The Metals Soc.) p. 5Google Scholar
  12. Thorne J K and Barice W J 1988SAMPE Q. 20 24Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Indian Academy of Sciences 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R L Saha
    • 1
  • T K Nandy
    • 1
  • R D K Misra
    • 1
  • K T Jacob
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Defence Metallurgical Research LaboratoryPO KanchanbaghHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Department of MetallurgyIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

Personalised recommendations