International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 201–235

Intrasexual selection and male mating strategies in baboons and macaques

  • Leo Berenstain
  • Ted D. Wade
Review Article

Abstract

If baboon and macaque mating systems constitute a form of female defense polygyny, male mating strategies should be intrasexually selected and should vary in predictable ways with female defensibility, and demographic factors which affect the numbers of competing males per estrous female in populations. Substantial behavioral evidence exists for intrasexual selection of male mating strategies in baboons and macaques. Limited evidence also offers tentative support for theorybased predictions about the relationship between male mating strategy and female defensibility. Although male dominance rank generally predicts mating success, there are a number of factors which tend to increase the success of subordinate males above that expected from a simple dominance-based model of priority of access to mates.

Key words

sexual selection mate choice dominance theory interference competition baboons macaques 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leo Berenstain
    • 1
  • Ted D. Wade
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate Group in Ecology, c/o Department of AnthropologyUniversity of California, DavisDavis
  2. 2.Primate Laboratory for Behavioral Studies, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado Medical CenterDenver

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