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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 179–193 | Cite as

Party composition and dynamics inPan paniscus

  • Frances J. White
Article

Abstract

The pygmy chimpanzee, or bonobo, Pan paniscus,diplays a fission-fusion social organization in which individuals associate in parties that vary in size and composition. Data from a 2-year field study of nonprovisioned P. paniscusshow that party composition varies with party size. Although females, on average, outnumber males, the proportion of males in the party increases in larger parties. This effect was not due to the greater number of known females. Both females and males will join and leave a party in the company of others, but only males appear frequently to join or leave as lone individuals. All-male parties were not observed, but all-female (nonnursery) parties were relatively common. These trends reflect greater cohesion among females than observed in P. troglodytes schweinfurthii.Cohesion between males and female P. paniscusmay increase with party size.

Key words

Pan paniscus party composition male-female ratio cohesion 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frances J. White
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and EvolutionState University of New YorkStony Brook

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