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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 43–71 | Cite as

Ranging, activity rhythms, and sociality in free-rangingTarsius bancanus: A preliminary report

  • Robin Huw Crompton
  • Patrick Mahedi Andau
Article

Abstract

Two male and two female western tarsiers were followed in primary and secondary lowland rainforest using radiotelemetry. Home ranges were determined to be at least 8.75 and 11.25 ha for two adult males and 9.5 and 4.5 hectares for two adult females. Sleeping sites tend to be clustered, and the study animals did not sleep with any other individuals. Tarsiers also hunt alone and were never seen with other tarsiers during the study period. However, calling is common and, with scent marking, probably represents the major mode of social communication outside of courtship and mating. Activity shows distinctc cyclicity, the exact pattern of which varies with the behavior under examination. The present evidence suggests that the social organization resembles that of Lorisinae and some Galaginae, but with much less direct or close contact, and does not tend to support arguments for the existence of monogamy or pair bonding in this species.

Key words

home range ecology Tarsius social behavior 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Huw Crompton
    • 1
  • Patrick Mahedi Andau
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy and Cell BiologyThe UniversityLiverpoolUK
  2. 2.Wildlife SectionForest DepartmentSabahEast Malaysia

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