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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 145–150 | Cite as

Reconceptualizing difficult groups and difficult members

  • Nina W. BrownEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Group leaders can expect to encounter group and member behaviors and attitudes that are usually termed as difficult. This article presents a different perspective that focuses on how the group leader can better understand and make visible what the troubling behavior is communicating about unspoken or unconscious needs, fantasies and desires. Suggestions for more effective interventions are proposed.

Keywords

Difficult groups Problem behaviors in group Group leadership 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Old Dominion UniversityNorfolk

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