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The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 25–28 | Cite as

Iodine deficiency disorders in 15 districts of India

  • G. S. TotejaEmail author
  • Padam Singh
  • B. S. Dhillon
  • B. N. Saxena
  • Principal Co-Investigators : F.U. Ahmed, Dibrugarh; R.P. Singh, Gaya; Balendu Prakash, Dehradun; K. Vijayaraghavan, Hyderabad; Y. Singh, Imphal; A. Rauf, Srinagar; U.C. Sarma, Guwahati; Sanjay Gandhi, Mumbai; L. Behl, Shimla; K. Mukherjee, Allahabad; S.S. Swami, Bikaner, Prakash Chandra, Patna; Chandrawati and Uday Mohan, Lucknow.
Original Article

Abstract

Methods : A multicentre study to assess iodine deficiency disorders (goitre and deaf-mutism/cretinism) in 1,45, 264 children (6-<12 years old) from 15 districts of ten states was carried out during 1997-2000. Urinary iodine excretion was also determined in 27481 children, while iodine content was estimated in 5881 samples of edible salt. The sampling methodology followed was a “30 cluster survey”.Results : The overall prevalence of goitre was 4.78% (4.66% of grade I and 0.12% of grade II) amongst the children examined. The highest prevalence of 31.02% goitre was observed in Dehradun district, while the lowest prevalence of 0.02% goitre was recorded in Bishnupur and Badaun districts. The overall prevalence of cretinism among children examined from seven districts was 0.072% whereas that of deaf-mutism was 0.27% among children examined from 8 districts. Median urinary iodine values was marginally less than the WHO cut-off values only in children of the 3 out of the 15 districts surveyed. Iodine content was found to be adequate in 55.45% of the salt samples.Conclusion : The results suggested a significant decline in the prevalence of goitre in most parts of the country.

Key words

Prevalence Goitre Cretinism Urinary iodine excretion 

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References

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. S. Toteja
    • 1
    Email author
  • Padam Singh
    • 1
  • B. S. Dhillon
    • 1
  • B. N. Saxena
    • 1
  • Principal Co-Investigators : F.U. Ahmed, Dibrugarh; R.P. Singh, Gaya; Balendu Prakash, Dehradun; K. Vijayaraghavan, Hyderabad; Y. Singh, Imphal; A. Rauf, Srinagar; U.C. Sarma, Guwahati; Sanjay Gandhi, Mumbai; L. Behl, Shimla; K. Mukherjee, Allahabad; S.S. Swami, Bikaner, Prakash Chandra, Patna; Chandrawati and Uday Mohan, Lucknow.
  1. 1.Central Co-ordinating UnitIndian Council of Medical ResearchNew DelhiIndia

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