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The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 69, Issue 10, pp 863–867 | Cite as

Pattern of pediatric ocular trauma in India

  • Rohit Saxena
  • Rajesh Sinha
  • Amitabh Purohit
  • Tanuj Dada
  • Rasik B. Vajpayee
  • Raj V. Azad
Original Article

Abstract

Objective : The aim of the study is to identify the causes, demographic and clinical profile and evaluate final visual outcome of pediatric ocular injuries.Methods : Two hundred and four children aged fourteen years or less presenting to the emergency services of a tertiary care centre with ocular injury were included. Demographic data, nature and cause of injury, duration between injury and presentation to an ophthalmologist and the diagnosis were recorded. Evaluation of visual acuity, anterior segment and fundus were done. All patients were appropriately managed and followed up on days 1, 7,1 month, 3 and 6 months.Result : Majority of injuries occurred in children of 5 years and older (87.7%). There were 133 (65.1%) boys and 71 (34.9%) girls. Forty-nine (24%) cases presented within 6 hours of injury while 70 (34.3%) presented after more than 24 hours after trauma. Most common cause of injury was bow and arrow (15.2%) followed by household appliances (14.3%). Closed globe injuries accounted for 42.2% injuries, open globe for 53.9% and 3.9% were chemical injuries. Best corrected visual acuity of 6/12 or better was achieved in 79 eyes (91.86%) in closed globe group. However, only 17 eyes (15.45%) in open globe group could achieve this.Conclusion : Most ocular injuries in children are preventable and occur from unsupervised games like bow and arrow and firecracker, which can lead to significant visual loss.

Key words

Pediatric trauma Ocular trauma 

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rohit Saxena
    • 1
  • Rajesh Sinha
    • 1
  • Amitabh Purohit
    • 1
  • Tanuj Dada
    • 1
  • Rasik B. Vajpayee
    • 1
  • Raj V. Azad
    • 1
  1. 1.Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic SciencesAll India Institute of Medical SciencesNew DelhiIndia

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