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Sadhana

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 275–284 | Cite as

Effect of EGR on the exhaust gas temperature and exhaust opacity in compression ignition engines

  • Avinash kumar Agrawal
  • Shrawan Kumar Singh
  • Shailendra Sinha
  • Mritunjay Kumar Shukla
Article

Abstract

In diesel engines, NOx formation is a highly temperature-dependent phenomenon and takes place when the temperature in the combustion chamber exceeds 2000 K. Therefore, in order to reduce NOx emissions in the exhaust, it is necessary to keep peak combustion temperatures under control.

One simple way of reducing the NOx emission of a diesel engine is by late injection of fuel into the combustion chamber. This technique is effective but increases fuel consumption by 10–15%, which necessitates the use of more effective NOx reduction techniques like exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Re-circulating part of the exhaust gas helps in reducing NOx, but appreciable paniculate emissions are observed at high loads, hence there is a trade-off between NOx and smoke emission. To get maximum benefit from this trade-off, a paniculate trap may be used to reduce the amount of unburnt particulates in EGR, which in turn reduce the paniculate emission also.

An experimental investigation was conducted to observe the effect of exhaust gas re-circulation on the exhaust gas temperatures and exhaust opacity. The experimental setup for the proposed experiments was developed on a two-cylinder, direct injection, air-cooled, compression ignition engine. A matrix of experiments was conducted for observing the effect of different quantities of EGR on exhaust gas temperatures and opacity

Keywords

Diesel engine EGR NOx pollution 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Avinash kumar Agrawal
    • 1
  • Shrawan Kumar Singh
    • 2
  • Shailendra Sinha
    • 1
  • Mritunjay Kumar Shukla
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of TechnologyKanpurIndia
  2. 2.Environmental Engineering and ManagementIndian Institute of TechnologyKanpurIndia

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