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Book reviews

  • Jeffrey Henderson
  • Charles Segal
  • Wolfgang Liebeschütz
  • Niklas Holzberg
  • Robert A. Kaster
  • Michele Salzman
  • J. F. Drinkwater
  • Denis Brearley
  • D. S. Carne-Ross
  • Carl J. Richard
  • Myrto Dragona-Monachou
Article
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References

  1. 1.
    M. RostovtzeffSocial and Economic History of the Hellenistic World, Oxford 1941, p. 841.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    E.g. F. Cumont,Les religions orientales dans le paganisme romain, Ed.4, Paris, 1929, esp. chs 1 & 2.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    See e.g. A. Momigliano,Alien Wisdom, the Limits of Hellenization, Cambridge 1975, 123–150 (ch. 6: “Iranians and Greeks”).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    N.H. Baynes, review of J. Vogt & E. Kornemann,Römische Geschichte, Leipzig 1933, inJRS XXV (1935) 83-4=idem, N.H. Baynes,Byzantine Essays, London 1960, 343–5.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    See K. Hopkins, “Rules of evidence”JRS lxviii (1978) 178–86, a review of Millar’sThe Emperor in the Roman World, which brilliantly criticises the method while totally closing his eyes to the great qualities of the book.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    A.D. Nock, “Greeks and Magi,”JRS xxx (1940) 191–98=idem, A.D. Nock,Essays on Religion and the Ancient World, Oxford 1972, vol 2, p. 516–26 being a review of J. Bidez, F. Cumont,Les mages hellénisés, Zoroastre Ostanès et Hystaspe d’après la tradition grecque, Paris 1938.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    E.g. p. 244–7 the “Syrian Goddess” at Hierapolis, p. 304–8 “Elagabalus” at Emesa.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Beck reports that new editions of theDe metris andDe litteris are being prepared by Beck and his mentor Wilfried Stroh, respectively (p. 23 n. 70).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Terentianus has been implicated in discussions of the so-calledpoetae novelli of the second centuryC.E., on whom see above all A. Cameron, “Poetae novelli,”Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 84 (1980): 127–75; cf. also P. Steinmetz, “Lyrische Dichtung im 2. Jahrhundert n. Chr.,Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (ANRW), II, 33.1, ed. by W. Haase, Berlin/New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1989, 259–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 1.
    L. Verheijen,Corpus Christianorum, Series Latina Vol. 27 (1981).Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Norbrook very properly and indeed unavoidably acknowledges Horace’s role in Marvell’s ode when he writes that he “probed his response to the revolutionary events of 1649–50 by going back as scrupulously as possible to the voice of Horace’s public odes.”Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    The Light in Troy (1982)273.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Cf.Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt, II.36.7 ed. by W. Haase, Berlin/New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1994, n.b.: P. Mitsis, “Natural Law and Natural Rights in Post-Aristotelian Philosophy. The Stoics and their Critics,” pp. 4812–4850, and P. A. Vander Waerdt, “Philosophical Influence on Roman Jurisprudence?, The Case of Stoicism and Natural Law,” pp. 4851–4900.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey Henderson
    • 1
  • Charles Segal
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Liebeschütz
    • 3
  • Niklas Holzberg
    • 4
  • Robert A. Kaster
    • 5
  • Michele Salzman
    • 1
  • J. F. Drinkwater
    • 3
  • Denis Brearley
    • 6
  • D. S. Carne-Ross
    • 1
  • Carl J. Richard
    • 7
  • Myrto Dragona-Monachou
    • 8
  1. 1.Boston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityUSA
  3. 3.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  4. 4.Universität MünchenMünchenGermany
  5. 5.University of ChicagoUSA
  6. 6.University of OttawaOttawaCanada
  7. 7.University of Southwestern LouisianaUSA
  8. 8.University of CreteRethymnonGreece

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