The Review of Black Political Economy

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 81–98 | Cite as

Some new historical evidence on the impact of affirmative action: Detroit, 1972

  • Thomas Hyclak
  • Larry W. Taylor
  • James B. Stewart

Abstract

A sample of Detroit area firms in 1972 is used to determine the effects of affirmative action requirements and other firm characteristics on the recruitment and hiring of women and black men. The results suggest that affirmative action changed firm hiring practices with respect to black males. The unique data set also allows for a test of Becker’s well-known hypothesis that customer prejudice may influence the hiring of blacks or females.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Hyclak
  • Larry W. Taylor
  • James B. Stewart

There are no affiliations available

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