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Integrative Physiological and Behavioral Science

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 308–313 | Cite as

A review of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)

  • C. Norman Shealy
Article

Abstract

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is quantitatively the most abundant hormone in humans and mammals, with a wide variety of physiological effects, including major regulatory effects upon the immune system. Two of the most striking aspects of DHEA are a steady decline in DHEA with age and a significant deficiency in DHEA in patients with several major diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.

The hormone is secreted in a non-sulfated (DHEA) and sulfated form (DHEA-S). The two are apparently interchangeable, and it appears likely that its physiological effects are achieved by derivative molecules that have yet to be identified.

Keywords

York Academy Dehydroepiandrosterone Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Striking Aspect DHEA Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Transaction Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Norman Shealy
    • 1
  1. 1.The Shealy InstituteSpringfield

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