Plant Molecular Biology Reporter

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 89–94 | Cite as

Genetic resources of unexploited native plants

  • Cyrus M. McKell
Genetic Resources

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References

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Copyright information

© International Society for Plant Molecular Biology Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cyrus M. McKell
    • 1
  1. 1.Native Plants, Inc.Salt Lake City

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