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Wool wax alcohols:A review

  • K. Motiuk
Soaps, Detergents, & Cosmetics

Abstract

Wool wax alcohols consist of aliphatic monoalcohols and alkane 1,2 diols, cholesterol, triterpene alcohols, and small amounts of hydrocarbons and autoxidation products. The monoalcohols and the diols consist of normal, iso and anteiso series. The average composition of the wool wax alcohols is based on data which were published during the past 25 years.

Keywords

Diol Aliphatic Alcohol Lanosterol Triterpene Alcohol Monohydric Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Motiuk
    • 1
  1. 1.Amerchol CorporationA Unit of CPC International, Inc.Amerchol Park, Edison

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