Advertisement

Plant Molecular Biology Reporter

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 156–164 | Cite as

First-generation transgenic plants and statistics

  • Jan-Peter Nap
  • Paul Keizer
  • Ritsert Jansen
Reviews

Abstract

The statistical analyses of populations of first-generation transgenic plants are commonly based on mean and variance and generally require a test of normality. Since in many cases the assumptions of normality are not met, analyses can result in erroneous conclusions. Transformation of data to normality, the use of other distributions, or distribution-free statistical tests should then be used to obtain valid conclusions from these populations.

Key Words

transgenic plants normal distribution distribution-free inference gene expression 

Abreviation

GUS

β-glucuronidase

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bain, L.J., and M. Engelhardt. 1989.Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics. PWS-Kent Publishing Co, Boston.Google Scholar
  2. Conover, W.J. 1980.Practical Nonparametric Statistics, 2nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Efron, B. 1982.The Jackknife, the Bootstrap and Other Resampling Plans. Soc. Indust. Appl. Math., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  4. Haaland, P.D. 1989.Experimental Design in Biotechnology, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York.Google Scholar
  5. Hall, P. 1992.The Bootstrap and Edgeworth Expansion. Springer Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  6. Hollander, M., and D.A. Wolfe. 1973.Nonparametric Statistical Methods. John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Jarque, C.M., and A.K. Bera. 1987. A test for normality of observations and regression residuals. Int. Stat. Rev. 55:163–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. McCullagh, P., and J.A. Nelder. 1989.Generalized Linear Models, 2nd Ed. Chapman and Hall, London.Google Scholar
  9. Neave, H.R., and P.L. Worthington. 1988.Distribution-free Tests. Unwin Hyman, London.Google Scholar
  10. Parker, R.E. 1979.Introductory Statistics for Biology. Edward Arnold, London.Google Scholar
  11. Sokal, R.R. and F.J. Rohlf. 1981.Biometry, 2nd Ed. W.H. Freeman and Company, New York.Google Scholar
  12. Sprent, P. 1989.Applied Nonparametric Statistical Methods. Chapman and Hall, London.Google Scholar
  13. Steel, R.G.D., and J.H. Torrie. 1980.Principles and Procedures of Statistics. A Biometrical Approach. McGraw-Hill Kogakusha, Tokyo.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Society for Plant Molecular Biology 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan-Peter Nap
    • 1
  • Paul Keizer
    • 2
  • Ritsert Jansen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Molecular BiologyWageningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Population Biology Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO)WageningenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations