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Frying performance of palm oil liquid fractions

  • U. Bracco
  • A. Dieffenbacher
  • L. Kolarovic
Technical

Abstract

Palm oil liquid fractions were used as frying media in household and industrial fryers and were compared to standard edible oils and fats, such as soybean, groundnut, sunflower, rapeseed and tallow. The analytical evaluation covered free fatty acids, viscosity, smoke and flame points, oxidized fatty acids, nonelution material (NEM), UV differential spectra, polymers and foam index. These values measure the extent of the oil degradation, i.e., oxidation, hydrolysis, splitting and polymerization. Moreover, they were combined with other analytical procedures (fatty acid composition, keeping qualities such as the time necessary for an oxygen-absorbing sample to reach a -0.5 psi pressure in a closed system) in order to have a large analytical control during the frying processes. The data collected show the suitability of edible oils and fats for frying purposes and indicate that palm oil liquid fractions perform satisfactorily as frying media. They have low degradation and produce fried foods with acceptable keeping qualities.

Keywords

Foam Frying Process Frying Time Smoke Point Frying Medium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Bracco
    • 1
  • A. Dieffenbacher
    • 1
  • L. Kolarovic
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Dept.Nestlé Products Technical Assistance Co., Ltd.La Tour de PeilzSwitzerland

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