Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society

, Volume 66, Issue 12, pp 1777–1780

Polymorphic behavior of some fully hydrogenated oils and their mixtures with liquid oil

  • L. deMan
  • J. M. deMan
  • B. Blackman
Technical

Abstract

Fully hydrogenated soybean oil, beef fat, rapeseed oil, a rapeseed, palm and soybean oil blend, cottonseed oil and palm oil were characterized by fatty acid composition, glyceride carbon number and partial glyceride content, as well as melting and crystallization properties. The latter were established by differential scanning calorimetry. Polymorphic behavior was analyzed by X-ray diffraction of the products in the flake or granulated form and when freshly crystallized from a melt. The hard fats were dissolved in canola oil at levels of 20, 50 and 80% and crystallized from the melt. Palm oil had the lowest crystallization temperature and the lowest melting temperature; rapessed had the highest crystallization temperature and soybean the highest melting temperature. All of the hard fats crystallized initially in the =00 form. When diluted with canola oil, only palm oil was able to maintain β′ stability.

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Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. deMan
    • 1
  • J. M. deMan
    • 2
  • B. Blackman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of GeulphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.DeMan Food Technology Services Inc.Guelph

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