Review of World Economics

, Volume 139, Issue 1, pp 1–37 | Cite as

Financial crises and reform of the international financial system

Abstract

Between December 1994 and March 1999, Mexico, Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Russia and Brazil experienced major financial crises, which were associated with massive recessions and extreme movements of exchange rates. Similar crises have threatened Turkey and Argentina (2000 and 2001) and most recently Brazil (again). This article discusses the reform of the international financial system with a focus on the role of the IMF—reforms directed at crisis prevention, and those intended to improve the responses to crises. The article concludes with an appraisal of what has been achieved, and what remains to be done to make the international financial system safer. JEL no. E5, E6, F3, F4, G1

Keywords

Financial crisis reform of the international financial system International Monetary Fund 

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Copyright information

© Kiel Institute for World Economics 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CitigroupNew York

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