Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society

, Volume 50, Issue 4, pp 122–125

Sterol composition of 19 vegetable oils

  • T. Itoh
  • T. Tamura
  • T. Matsumoto
Technical

Abstract

The unsaponifiables from 19 vegetable oils were divided into a sterol and three other fractions by thin-layer chromatography. All except olive and palm kernel oils gave the sterol fraction in a large quantity. Compositions of the sterol fractions were determined by gas liquid chromatography. Identification of each sterol was carried out by gas liquid chromatography and combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Campesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol were present in all oils, and a minor amount of cholesterol in majority of the oils. Brassicasterol occurrence was widespread but its content was extremely small in oils other than rapeseed oil. Other sterols, presumably δ7-stigmastenol and δ5- and δ7-avenasterol were detected in most of the oils.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Eisner, J., and D. Firestone, J. Ass. Off. Agr. Chem. 46:542 (1963).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fedeli, E., A. Lanzani, P. Capella and G. Jacini, JAOCS 43:254 (1966); Jacini, G., E. Fedeli and A. Lanzani, J. Ass. Off. Anal. Chem. 50:84 (1967).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Karleskind, A., F. Audiau and J.P. Wolff, Rev. Fr. Corps Gras 13:165 (1966); Karleskind, A., Ibid. Rev. Fr. Corps Gras 15:379 (1968).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gracián, J., and T. Martel, Grasas Aceites 20:231 (1969).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ito, S., T. Tamura and T. Matsumoto, J. Res. Sci. Tech., Nihon University, No. 13, 1956, p. 99.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Knights, B.A., J. Gas Chromatogr. 5:273 (1967).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bergman, J., B.O. Lindgren and C.M. Svahn, Acta Chem. Scand. 19:1661 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Benveniste, P., L. Hirth and G. Ourisson, Phytochemistry 5:31, 45 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Aplin, R.T., and G.M. Hornby, J. Chem. Soc. (B) 1966:1078.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Knights, B.A., Phytochemistry 4:857 (1965); Knights, B.A., and W. Laurie, Ibid. Phytochemistry 6:407 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Tamura, T., T. Itoh and T. Matsumoto, Yukagaku 22:157 (1973).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Fioriti, J.A., M.J. Kanuk and R.J. Sims, JAOCS 48:240 (1971).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ikekawa, N., K. Tsuda and K. Sakai, Anal. Chem. 40:1139 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Idler, D.R., S.W. Nicksic, D.R. Johnson, V.W. Meloche, H.A. Schuette and C.A. Baumann, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 75:1712 (1953).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Idler, D.R., A.A. Kandutsch and C.A. Baumann, Ibid. 75:4325 (1953).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Firestone, D., JAOCS 45:210A (1968).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Copius-Peereboom, J.W., and H.W. Beekes, J. Chromatogr. 17:99 (1965).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Seher, A., and E. Homberg, Fette Seifen Anstrichm. 70:481 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Thrope, C.W., J. Ass. Off. Anal. Chem. 52:778 (1969).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Capella, P., and G. Losi, Ind. Agr. 6:277 (1968).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Ingram, D.S., B.A. Knights, I. MacEvoy and P. McKay, Phytochemistry 7:1241 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Frost, D.J., and J.P. Ward, Tetrahedron Lett. 34:3779 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Copius-Peerboom, J.W., J. Gas Chromatogr. 3:325 (1965).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Imamura, M., I. Niiya, T. Maruyama and H. Terao, Shoku-Ei-Shi 9:112 (1968).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Recourt, J.H., Planta Medica Suppl. 15:3 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Cerutti, G., G. Volonterio and P. Resmini, Riv. Ital. Sostanze Grasse 46:356 (1969).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists’ Society 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Itoh
    • 1
  • T. Tamura
    • 1
  • T. Matsumoto
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Science & TechnologyNihon UniversityTokyo

Personalised recommendations