Journal of Science Teacher Education

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 1–8 | Cite as

The meanings of hands-on science

  • Lawrence B. Flick
Article

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Copyright information

© The Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS) 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence B. Flick
    • 1
  1. 1.Washington State UniversityRichland

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