In Vitro

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 290–293 | Cite as

Transforming activities of trichloroethylene and proposed industrial alternatives

  • P. J. Price
  • C. M. Hassett
  • J. I. Mansfield

Summary

Three chlorinated hydrocarbons, proposed or already in use as industrial subsitutes for the hydrocarbon trichloroethylene, were tested for in vitro transforming potential in a Fischer rat embryo cell system (F1706), which previously has been shown to be sensitive to transformation by chemical carcinogens. Trichloroethylene and the three substitutes (1,1,1 trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene and methylene chloride) all were found to induce transformation, the three substitutes being equal or more efficient transforming agents.

Key words

in vitro transformation chlorinated hydrocarbons Fischer rat embryo cells 

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Copyright information

© Tissue Culture Association 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Price
    • 1
  • C. M. Hassett
    • 1
  • J. I. Mansfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Microbiological AssociatesTorrey Pines Research CenterLa Jolla

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