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Immunogenetics

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 186–191 | Cite as

HLA-G gene polymorphism in a Japanese population

  • Takahiro Yamashita
  • Tomoyuki Fujii
  • Yoshihisa Watanabe
  • Katsushi Tokunaga
  • Kenji Tadokoro
  • Takeo Juji
  • Yuji Taketani
Original Paper

Abstract

Polymorphism of theHLA-G gene in a Japanese population was investigated employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) analysis, and DNA direct sequencing. Nucleotide sequence variations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of theHLA-G gene in 54 healthy Japanese individuals were examined. In addition, seven Japanese samples carrying commonHLA haplotypes were analyzed. In total, nine single-base substitutions compared with the sequence ofG * 1011 were identified: one in intron 1 (nucleotide position 970), one in exon 2 (the third base of codon 57: G→A), three in intron 2 (1264, 1276, and 1292), three in exon 3 (the third base of codon 93: C→T, the third base of codon 107: A→T, and the first base of codon 110: C→A), and one in intron 3 (2334). The substitution at codon 110 was non-synonymous and led to an amino acid substitution from leucine to isoleucine. The other three nucleotide substitutions in exons were synonymous. Through analysis of combinations of the exon 2, 3, and 4 nucleotide sequences we identified four alleles, which we provisionally designatedGJ1, GJ2, GJ3, andGJ4. The allele frequencies were estimated to be 0.33, 0.16, 0.45, and 0.06, respectively. Nucleotide sequences ofGJ1, GJ2, andGJ4 were identical toG * 01011, the clone7.0E, andG * 01013, respectively.GJ3 was a newly observed allele and was officially designatedG * 0104 by the WHO Nomenclature Committee in January 1996. Strong positive associations were observed betweenHLA-G alleles andHLA-A,-B, or-DRB1 alleles.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Japanese Sample Annealing Position Human Trophoblast Distinct Banding Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takahiro Yamashita
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomoyuki Fujii
    • 1
  • Yoshihisa Watanabe
    • 2
  • Katsushi Tokunaga
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kenji Tadokoro
    • 2
  • Takeo Juji
    • 2
  • Yuji Taketani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of ResearchJapanese Red Cross Central Blood CenterTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Human Genetics, School of International HealthUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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