Immunogenetics

, Volume 44, Issue 4, pp 246–253

Peptide binding characteristics of the coeliac disease-associated DQ(α1*0501, β1*0201) molecule

  • Yvonne van de Wal
  • Yvonne M. C. Kooy
  • Jan Woulter Drijfhout
  • Reinout Amons
  • Frits Koning
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/BF02602553

Cite this article as:
van de Wal, Y., Kooy, Y.M.C., Drijfhout, J.W. et al. Immunogenetics (1996) 44: 246. doi:10.1007/BF02602553

Abstract

Genetic susceptibility to coeliac disease (CD) is strongly associated with the expression of theHLA-DQ2 (α1*0501, β1*0201) allele. There is evidence that this DQ2 molecule plays a role in the pathogenesis of CD as a restriction element for gliadin-specific T cells in the gut. However, it remains largely unclear which fragments of gliadin can actually be presented by the disease-associated DQ dimer. With a view to identifying possible CD-inducing antigens, we studied the peptide binding properties of DQ2. For this purpose, peptides bound to HLA-DQ2 were isolated and characterized. Dominant peptides were found to be derived from two self-proteins: in addition to several sizevariants of the invariant chain (li)-derived CLIP peptide, a relatively large amount of an major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-derived peptide was found. Analogues of this naturally processed epitope (MHClα46–63) were tested in a cell-free peptide binding competition assay to investigate the requirements for binding to DQ2. First, a core sequence of 10 amino acids within the MHClα46–63 peptide was identified. By subsequent single amino acid substitution analysis of this core sequence, five putative anchor residues were identified at relative positions P1, P4, P6, P7, and P9. Replacement by the large, positively charged Lys at these positions resulted in a dramatic loss of binding. However, several other non-conservative substitutions had little or no discernable effect on the binding capacity of the peptides.

Substitutions at P1 and P4 were most critical, suggesting a more prominent role as anchor residues. Structural features of the DQ2 molecule that may relate to the binding motif and to gluten sensitivity are discussed.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yvonne van de Wal
    • 1
  • Yvonne M. C. Kooy
    • 1
  • Jan Woulter Drijfhout
    • 1
  • Reinout Amons
    • 2
  • Frits Koning
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Immunohaematology and BloodbankLeiden University HospitalLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Medical BiochemistrySylvius LaboratoriesLeidenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations