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Primates

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 89–92 | Cite as

Dracunculiasis in South Indian bonnet monkey

  • Venkatachalam Sankar
  • Seppan Prakash
  • Rathinasamy Muthusamy
  • Krishnaswami Kamakshi
Short Communication

Abstract

Dracunculiasis, popularly known as Guinea worm disease, has been eradicated from Tamil Nadu, India, and there have been no indigenous cases reported since 1981. This report describes a female bonnet monkey with dracunculiasis. She presented with fever and a blister in left hind limb. The blister ruptured on exposure to water and a 7-cm-long worm was extruded. The worm died before it could be histologically examined. The diagnosis was based on the typical clinical course, which was pathognomonic of dracunculiasis. Review of literature did not reveal any previous report of dracunculiasis in South Indian bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata). This paper raises the question whether wild monkeys might act as reservoirs of human infection and cause resurgence of the disease in South India.

Key Words

Dracunculiasis Guinea worm disease Parasites Bonnet monkey Macaca radiata 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Venkatachalam Sankar
    • 1
  • Seppan Prakash
    • 1
  • Rathinasamy Muthusamy
    • 1
  • Krishnaswami Kamakshi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, Dr. Arcot Lakshmanasamy Mudaliar Postgraduate Institute of Basic Medical SciencesUniversity of MadrasChennaiIndia

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