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Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 44, Issue 6, pp 382–386 | Cite as

Epidemiology of fractures of the proximal femur associated with osteoporosis in Barcelona, Spain

  • Adolfo Diez
  • Jordi Puig
  • Maria Teresa Martinez
  • José Luis Diez
  • Jaume Aubia
  • Juan Vivancos
Clinical Investigations

Summary

We studied the epidemiology of osteoporotic fractures of the proximal femur (cervical and trochanteric fractures) in residents of Barcelona, aged 45 years or over, for a 1-year period. Fractures resulting from metastases were not included. During the period of observation, a total of 1,358 patients with hip fractures were treated at acute-care hospitals in Barcelona. Of those, 1,163 were researched. For each case, age, sex, and home address were registered. The incidence of hip fractures per 100,000 inhabitants aged 45 years or over was 115.6 in men and 252.2 in women. Age was the most influencing factor in the occurrence of hip fractures. Women presented fractures of the proximal femur more frequently than men. The epidemiological curve was similar to that reported in other western countries, although the crude rate was lower than that found in northern countries. We conclude that osteoporotic fractures of the proximal femur are common processes in the Mediterranean area, and reflect the impact of osteoporosis in our environment; however, the lower incidence compared with northern geographical areas may probably reflect the influence of climatic, ethnic, or other factors.

Key words

Hip fractures Proximal femoral fractures Osteoporosis Incidence Epidemiology 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adolfo Diez
    • 1
  • Jordi Puig
    • 1
  • Maria Teresa Martinez
    • 1
  • José Luis Diez
    • 1
  • Jaume Aubia
    • 1
  • Juan Vivancos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine and Metabolic UnitHospital G.M.D. EsperançaBarcelonaSpain

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