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Instructional principles for self-regulation

  • Kathryn Ley
  • Dawn B. Young
Development

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to suggest principles for embedding support in instruction to facilitate self-regulation (SR) in less expert learners. The principles are based on an analysis of the growing body of research on the distinctive self-regulation differences between higher and lower achieving learners. The analysis revealed four instructional principles that designers should consider to provide support for self-regulation. Each principle is supported by research and instructional examples are included.

Keywords

Instructional Intervention American Educational Research Journal Educational Technology Research Graphic Organizer Effective Learning Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn Ley
    • 1
  • Dawn B. Young
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Instructional TechnologyUniversity of Houston Clear LakeHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Behavioral Sciences at Bossier Parish Community CollegeBossierUSA

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