Surgery Today

, Volume 29, Issue 8, pp 724–729 | Cite as

New methods of control against postoperative methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus infection

  • Shinya Kusachi
  • Yoshinobu Sumiyama
  • Jiro Nagao
  • Kunihiko Kawai
  • Yoichi Arima
  • Yuichi Yoshida
  • Hirohisa Kajiwara
  • Yoshihisa Saida
  • Yoichi Nakamura
Original Articles

Abstract

The incidence of postoperative infections caused by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Japan has been increasing dramatically. In March 1990, we assigned special doctors in infection control (infection control doctor, ICD), and defined comprehensive controls against MRSA infection. A total of 3 536 cases of digestive tract surgery performed at our department were studied during the period between September 1987 and August 1997. We changed the use of antibiotics to prevent postoperative infection. Cefazolin (CEZ) was employed for surgery of the upper digestive tract, including esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and gallbladder. Cefotiam (CTM) was employed for surgery of the lower digestive tract, liver, and pancreas. In esophageal resection, the tracheal tube was extracted during the early postoperative period, and for cervical esophagogastroanastomosis, the autosuture was changed to layer-to-layer anastomosis. We have achieved successful control of postoperative MRSA infection, the incidence having decreased to 0.3% (9/2703). In conclusion, our methods of control against postoperative MRSA infection implies that comprehensive measures of prevention, including the reviewed specification and usage of antibiotics and operation management, have been well implemented. This value is the lowest and the first of any domestic hospital or institute in Japan, suggesting a continued and significant decrease.

Key Words

MRSA infection digestive tract surgery post-operative infection infection control doctor 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shinya Kusachi
    • 1
  • Yoshinobu Sumiyama
    • 1
  • Jiro Nagao
    • 1
  • Kunihiko Kawai
    • 1
  • Yoichi Arima
    • 1
  • Yuichi Yoshida
    • 1
  • Hirohisa Kajiwara
    • 1
  • Yoshihisa Saida
    • 1
  • Yoichi Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Third Department of SurgeryToho University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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