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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 349–395 | Cite as

Japanese archaeology in the 1990s

  • Gina L. BarnesEmail author
  • Masaaki Okita
Article

Abstract

As scientific archaeology takes hold in Japan, our understanding of the nature and content of Japanese prehistory is changing radically. All of the period boundaries of Japanese prehistory are being rewritten, and many new “archaeologies” are growing up around particular scientific techniques. New publications in English give greater access to archaeological thinking in Japan, while Japanese publications focus on ever-narrowing aspects of prehistoric lifeways. Policy changes are giving archaeologists more access to the imperial tombs, and rescue teams are under less obligation to “save everything” as selective preservation is instituted.

Key Words

Japanese archaeology archaeological science archaeological theory media archaeology and politics 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Research in East Asian ArchaeologyUniversity of DurhamDurhamEngland
  2. 2.Department of ArchaeologyTenri UniversityTenri-shi, NaraJapan

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