International Journal of Anthropology

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 9–15 | Cite as

Lead exposure in italy: 800 BC-700 AD

  • A. C. Aufderheide
  • G. RappJr.
  • L. E. WittmersJr.
  • J. E. Wallgren
  • R. Macchiarelli
  • G. Fornaciari
  • F. Mallegni
  • R. S. Corruccini
Article

Abstract

Certain social and industrial activities that were common among Imperial Age Romans have been suggested to have caused lead poisoning whose sociological consequences may have afflicted many members of the aristocratic social stratum. Evaluation of this suggestion has awaited quantitative data. This study reports the skeletal lead content of twenty Italian archaeological populations. Imperial Age populations demonstrated up to ten-fold more bone lead than their predecessors or successors.

Key words

Lead bone skeletal Italy archaeological 

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Copyright information

© International Institute for the Study of Man 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Aufderheide
    • 1
  • G. RappJr.
    • 1
  • L. E. WittmersJr.
    • 1
  • J. E. Wallgren
    • 1
  • R. Macchiarelli
    • 2
  • G. Fornaciari
    • 3
  • F. Mallegni
    • 4
  • R. S. Corruccini
    • 5
  1. 1.Paleobiology and Archaeometry LaboratoriesUniversity of Minnesota-DuluthDuluth
  2. 2.Section of AnthropologyNational Museum of Prehistory-Ethnology “L. Pigorini”RomeItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Pathological Anatomy and Histology, Paleopathology Laboratory, Medical SchoolUniversity of PisaItaly
  4. 4.Department of Archaeological SciencesUniversity of PisaItaly
  5. 5.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Southern Illinois at CarbondaleCarbondale

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