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Human Evolution

, Volume 17, Issue 1–2, pp 113–122 | Cite as

Early Hominid diversity, age and biogeography of the Malawi-Rift

  • Schrenk F. 
  • Kullmer O. 
  • Sandrock O. 
  • Bromage T. G. 
Article

Abstract

Remains of earlyHomo andParanthropus have been recovered from two contemporaneous sites (Uraha and Malema) in the “Hominid Corridor” in Northern Malawi (Chiwondo Beds). Faunal dating suggests an age of 2.5–2.3 Ma for both hominids. The two specimens, a mandible attributed toHomo rudolfensis (UR 501 from Uraha), and a maxillary fragment ofParanthropus boisci. (RC 911 from Malema) known only from eastern Africa, represent the southernmost known distribution of these taxa. The biogeographic significance of these hominids from the Malawi-Rift lay in their association with the eastern African endemic animal group. Biogeographic variation in south-eastern Africa may be linked to habitat change occurring due to climate change, with maximum change occurring around 2.5 Ma.

Keywords

Paranthropus biogeographical variation 

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Copyright information

© International Institute for the Study of Man 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Schrenk F. 
    • 1
  • Kullmer O. 
    • 1
  • Sandrock O. 
    • 1
  • Bromage T. G. 
    • 2
  1. 1.Hessisches Landesmuseum DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyC.U.N.Y. Hunter CollegeNew YorkUSA

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