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Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 44, Issue 5, pp 487–494 | Cite as

Thermoelastic investigations for fatigue life assessment

  • R. A. Tomlinson
  • L. Marsavina
Article

Abstract

An investigation is presented on the suitability and accuracy of a thermoelastic technique for the analysis of fatigue cracks. The stress intensity factor ranges ΔK I and ΔK II are determined from thermoelastic data recorded from around the tip of a sharp slot in a steel specimen under biaxial load, in order to assess the accuracy of the technique. ΔK I and ΔK II are determined to within 4% and 9% of a theoretical prediction, respectively. The results from a similar test on a fatigue crack under biaxial load are also presented. These show that thermoelastic stress analysis is a rapid and accurate way of analyzing mixed-mode fatigue cracks. A discussion is given on the potential of thermoelastic stress analysis of propagating cracks.

Key Words

Thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) fatigue cracks biaxial 

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Tomlinson
    • 1
  • L. Marsavina
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  2. 2.University Politechnica TimisoaraTimisoaraRomania

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