Immunogenetics

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 452–457

Molecular cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human perforin (PFP) gene

  • Yoichi Shinkai
  • Michihiro C. Yoshida
  • Keiko Maeda
  • Tetsuji Kobata
  • Kazuo Maruyama
  • Junji Yodoi
  • Hideo Yagita
  • Ko Okumura
Article

Abstract

Human perforin cDNA was isolated and the complete nucleotide sequence of the gene determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of human perforin showed 68.4% similarity to that of mouse perforin. RNA blot analysis of the human perforin gene revealed that the gene product is expressed preferentially in killer-type cells among cell lines tested, and in large granular lymphocytes among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In situ hybridization analysis with a human perforin cDNA probe revealed that the human perforin (PFP) gene is located on chromosome17q11-21.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoichi Shinkai
    • 1
  • Michihiro C. Yoshida
    • 2
  • Keiko Maeda
    • 1
  • Tetsuji Kobata
    • 1
  • Kazuo Maruyama
    • 3
  • Junji Yodoi
    • 4
  • Hideo Yagita
    • 1
  • Ko Okumura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyJuntendo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Chromosome Research Unit, Faculty of ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Molecular BiologyDNAX Research Institute of Molecular and Cellular BiologyPalo AltoUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Immunology and Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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