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Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 265–274 | Cite as

Computational linguistics and the humanist

  • William Benzon
  • David G. Hays
Article

Keywords

Computational Linguistic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pergamon Press 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Benzon
    • 1
  • David G. Hays
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New YorkBuffalo

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