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Auditory brainstem evoked responses in autistic children

  • Stuart M. Rosenblum
  • Joel R. Arick
  • David A. Krug
  • E. Gene Stubbs
  • Norton B. Young
  • Rodney O. Pelson
Article

Abstract

Previous studies have implicated a brainstem dysfunction in the syndrome of autism. This study matched six autistic children with six normal children by age and sex to evaluate brainstem evoked response (BSER) to auditory stimuli. An evaluation of pure tone audiometric threshold showed no evidence of impairment; however, the electrophysiologic responses differed for the autistic and control groups. The BSER of the autistic children was remarkable for showing increased latency and markedly increased variability. The findings from this study add additional evidence of a brainstem dysfunction in autistic children, while the electrophysiologic variability supports the hypothesis of perceptual inconstancy.

Keywords

School Psychology Auditory Stimulus Pure Tone Normal Child Autistic Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart M. Rosenblum
    • 1
  • Joel R. Arick
    • 2
  • David A. Krug
    • 2
  • E. Gene Stubbs
    • 1
  • Norton B. Young
    • 1
  • Rodney O. Pelson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Oregon Health Sciences CenterUSA
  2. 2.Portland State UniversityUSA

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