Personal Technologies

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 238–240 | Cite as

The Memory Box

Article

Abstract

A Memory Box was built to illustrate the possibility of recording and attaching stories to memorabilia kept in a box. Potential users then provided a range of ideas about what kinds of stories and objects they would keep in the box, and how they would use it. The findings confirm the value of attaching stories to souvenirs, especially in the context of gift-giving, and have implications for how this might be implemented through augmented reality interfaces.

Keywords

Audio Digital storytelling Photographs Souvenirs 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hewlett Packard LaboratoriesBristolUK

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