Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 57–63

Bone cells from spinal hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy) maintain elevated levels of collagen productionin vitro

  • Masashi Yamazaki
  • Sumio Goto
  • Yasumasa Kobayashi
  • Atsuhi Terakado
  • Hideshige Moriya
  • Yutaka Nagai
Article

Abstract

The twy (tiptoe-walking-Yoshimura) mouse is a mutant having a systemic hyperostotic disposition. Osseous overgrowth occurs not only in the spine but also in other skeletal tissues including the calvarium. To clarify the pathogenic mechanism of hyperostotic lesions, bone cells were cultured from twy and normal mouse calvariae to analyze the growth and extracellular matrix production in both genotypes. The cultures of osteoblast-enriched cells were established by explant procedure. The cells of the twy genotype showed accelerated growth and elevated levels of collagen synthetic activity compared to normal cells. However, no significant difference was noted in noncollagenous protein synthesis between the two genotypes. Furthermore, the mutant cells maintained these abnormal functions during several cell passagesin vitro. These results indicated that an unusual phenotype of twy bone cells distinguished by accelerated growth and selective stimulation of collagen production may play a major role in the development of hyperostotic lesions in twy micein vivo.

Key words

Collagen Bone cell Hyperostosis Twy mouse 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Bone Metabolism Research 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masashi Yamazaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sumio Goto
    • 2
  • Yasumasa Kobayashi
    • 2
  • Atsuhi Terakado
    • 2
  • Hideshige Moriya
    • 2
  • Yutaka Nagai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Tissue Physiology, Medical Research InstituteTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of MedicineChiba UniversityChibaJapan

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